AEG: Swearingen on Controlled Release Environmental Reactants

AEG Members & Friends,

This is a notice that our first chapter meeting of 2017 will occur on Thursday January 19th  from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the office of ECS Mid-Atlantic LLC at 14026 Thunderbolt Place, in Chantilly, Virginia. The presentation, Controlled Release Environmental Reactants – Green and Sustainable Approach to In-Situ Remediation, will be given by Dr. Lindsay Swearingen, Co-Owner and Managing Partner at Specialty Earth Sciences.

Please use our E-Pay/RSVP system to register for this event.

Visit www.AEG-BWH.org for all information about our chapter, upcoming events, etc!

We look forward to seeing you all there.

TOPIC: Controlled Release Environmental Reactants – Green and Sustainable Approach to In-Situ Remediation

 PRESENTER: Dr. Lindsay Swearingen – Co-owner and Managing Partner at Specialty Earth Sciences

MEETING INFORMATION:

 DATE: Thursday January 19, 2017

TIME:  6:00 pm to 8:00 p.m.

LOCATION:

ECS Mid-Atlantic, LLC

14026 Thunderbolt Place

Suite 100

Chantilly, Virginia 20151

 

COST (dinner & meeting):

Members:                    $40

Non-members:            $45

Discounts Available:

Students save $20

Retirees save $10

MEETING SCHEDULE:

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.                         Check-In, Social Hour & Dinner

7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.                         Section Business & Presentation

RESERVATIONS:

To reserve a seat, please visit our website & E-Pay System at:

www.AEG-BWH.org

Holtz on “Paranormal Geology” at NSF HQ

“Hollow Earth, Sunken Continents, and a World Made of Plankton? A Look at Paranormal Geology” at 1:30 p.m. on January 14 at the National Science Foundation, Room 110, 4201 Wilson Boulevard in Arlington. (Use the Ballston-MU Metro stop; enter NSF from the corner of 9th St. N. and N. Stuart St.)

A description of his talk: “The public is familiar with pseudoscientific interpretations of biology (Creationism, cryptozoology, etc.) and astronomy (astrology, UFO abductions, etc.), but all sciences have their pseudo-versions. There have been various pseudo-geologies proposed over the centuries: interpretations of the structure and composition of the Earth radically at odds with our current understanding. Among these are ideas that the Earth is hollow (various configurations, including a notable one where we are on the inside of curve!), sunken continents (Atlantis, Lemuria, and beyond), and a truly bizarre idea that all physical matter on Earth was once alive. Some of these ideas were proposed in a scientific context, but have survived in various circles long after their refutation. Dr. Holtz will examine the origins, beliefs, and fates of these alternate Earth interpretations.”

Sponsored by National Capital Area Skeptics, the event is free and open to the public. For further information, visit:

http://www.ncas.org/2016/12/january-10-hollow-earth-sunken.html

January 2017 meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, January 18

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

The Miocene Planet of the Apes

Ashley Hammond

Postdoctoral Scientist, Center for Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology (CASHP),

Department of Anthropology, George Washington University

There were probably more than 30 genera of apes alive throughout Africa and Eurasia during the Miocene (23-5 Mya), whereas there are just a handful alive in forests in Africa and SE Asia today. Here I will discuss the major locomotor transformations that occurred during ape evolution, as revealed by the anatomy of the pelvis and femur of fossil apes. We see that the majority of apes in the past moved differently from the apes that persist today, and that there was an increase in adaptations for suspensory locomotion relatively late during ape evolution.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society

Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy geology field trip

Geologic Excursion! — Saturday, March 25, 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., Location TBD. Join geologist Randy Orndorff and Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy as we take a geologic excursion across western Loudoun County. The geology of Virginia records more than 1 billion years of Earth history including four mountain-building events and subsequent drifting of continents. This trip will look at sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks that help geologists understand geologic history and how it impacts our lives today. The outing will require some short hikes, and participants should pack a lunch and beverage. Limit: 20 participants. Registration required: Sign Up Online. Questions: Contact info@loudounwildlife.org.

PGS: Geophysics as a way of life

Please join us for the December 15, 2016, meeting of the Potomac Geophysical Society (PGS) at 7:00 p.m. at Crowne Plaza – Tysons Corner hotel, 1960 Chain Bridge Road, 22102.  This location is within one-half mile of the Tysons Corner Metro station, near I-495, and has free parking available.  Our private meeting room is located in the back of the Tuscan Grille restaurant on the second floor of the hotel.  This month only, the optional dinner cost will be discounted to $30 for members and non-members ,and is inclusive of iced tea, coffee, tax and gratuity.  Members and guests may attend the presentation after dinner for no charge; we estimate that the presentation will begin at 8:15 p.m.  For attendees who arrive early, the social will be held in O’Malley’s Pub on the first floor of the Crowne Plaza hotel.  Drinks may also be purchased in the private meeting room on a cash basis.

Social: 6:00-7:00 p.m. O’Malley’s Pub, first floor Crowne Plaza

Dinner: 7:00-8:15 p.m. Tuscan Grille, second floor Crowne Plaza

Meeting & Presentation: 8:15-9:30 p.m. Tuscan Grille, second floor Crowne Plaza.

This Month’s Talk: 

Catherine Cox

ATR Corp

Geophysics isn’t Just a Study, It’s a Way of Life

Abstract:

A location is characterized by its people and culture, but Geophysics is not typically the first thing that comes to mind when describing the culture of a place.  Catherine will share perspective as a Geophysicist from a cultural and professional’s point of view how geophysics plays a key role in a location’s cultural  identity.

Bio:

Catherine Cox is a Senior Engineer at ATR Corporation since 2015. Prior to her arrival in Washington, she was a Geophysicist and academic liaison with Signal Hill Petroleum in Long Beach, California . She received a B.S. in Geology in form Middle Tennessee University and completed a M.S. in Geophysics from the University of Oklahoma. She has also worked with the Bell Geospace in Houston. In her free time, Catherine enjoys running and being outdoors.

Dear PGS Members,

Please reply by December 12, 2016 at noon if you plan to attend the dinner and/or the meeting at Crowne Plaza Tysons Corner.  Please find the flyer for this talk attached this email, feel free to post and spread the word.

Please join us for the December 15, 2016, meeting of the Potomac Geophysical Society (PGS) at 7:00 p.m. at Crowne Plaza – Tysons Corner hotel, 1960 Chain Bridge Road, 22102.  This location is within one-half mile of the Tysons Corner Metro station, near I-495, and has free parking available.  Our private meeting room is located in the back of the Tuscan Grille restaurant on the second floor of the hotel.  This month only, the optional dinner cost will be discounted to $30 for members and non-members ,and is inclusive of iced tea, coffee, tax and gratuity.  Members and guests may attend the presentation after dinner for no charge; we estimate that the presentation will begin at 8:15 p.m.  For attendees who arrive early, the social will be held in O’Malley’s Pub on the first floor of the Crowne Plaza hotel.  Drinks may also be purchased in the private meeting room on a cash basis.

Social: 6:00-7:00 p.m. O’Malley’s Pub, first floor Crowne Plaza

Dinner: 7:00-8:15 p.m. Tuscan Grille, second floor Crowne Plaza

Meeting & Presentation: 8:15-9:30 p.m. Tuscan Grille, second floor Crowne Plaza.

This Month’s Talk: Geophysics isn’t Just a Study, It’s a Way of Life

Abstract:

A location is characterized by its people and culture, but Geophysics is not typically the first thing that comes to mind when describing the culture of a place.  Catherine will share perspective as a Geophysicist from a cultural and professional’s point of view how geophysics plays a key role in a location’s cultural  identity.

Bio:

Catherine Cox is a Senior Engineer at ATR Corporation since 2015. Prior to her arrival in Washington, she was a Geophysicist and academic liaison with Signal Hill Petroleum in Long Beach, California . She received a B.S. in Geology in form Middle Tennessee University and completed a M.S. in Geophysics from the University of Oklahoma. She has also worked with the Bell Geospace in Houston. In her free time, Catherine enjoys running and being outdoors.

e-mail distribution address of the Potomac Geophysical Society

www.potomacgeophysical.com

UMD: Arevalo on planetary mass spectrometry

University of Maryland 2016 Geology Colloquium Series

Friday, November 18th 2016 at 3:00 pm
in PLS 1140

Ricardo Arevalo
NASA-GSFC

Planetary Exploration and the role of in situ mass spectrometry

Top-priority science questions drive the course of NASA (and ESA) mission selection, and are defined openly by groups of scientists, engineers and planetary advocates. As the ambitions of the community evolve, so do the technologies required to address them. For decades, mass spectrometers have served as low-risk, cost-efficient means to explore the inner and outer reaches of the solar system. Legacy analyzers have characterized a range of planetary environments, including the lunar exosphere, the surface of Mars, and the atmospheres of Venus, Mars and outer planets. However, the collection of complicated mass spectra and detection of organic compounds on Mars and Titan, coupled with ground-based measurements of organics observed in meteorites and cometary materials, has underlined the importance of molecular disambiguation in next generation instruments. In response to these demands, next generation mass spectrometers promise: compatibility with ! chemical separation techniques, such as two-step ionization methods and liquid or gas chromatography; isolation/enrichment of targeted ion signals and intentional fragmentation of precursor (or “parent”) molecules; and, intrinsically higher mass resolving powers to distinguish compounds with nearly identical mass-to-charge ratios.

Here, a review is provided on the process by which missions concepts are formulated, and the evolution of mass spectrometry as a versatile analytical tool for probing the chemical compositions of high-priority planetary environments.

UMD Geology: van Keken on computational geodynamics

2016 Geology Colloquium Series

Friday, November 11th 2016 at 3:00 pm
in PLS 1140

Peter van Keken
Carnegie Institution for Science

A computational geodynamicist’s journey through the Earth in three acts: chemical geodynamics, mantle plumes and subduction zones.