Category Archives: Uncategorized

Paleontological Society of Washington November seminar

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, November 15

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

An Amateur’s Collection of Corals from the North East DC Area

Christopher Hough

Member, Paleontological Society of Washington

From the Coastal Plain to the eastern edge of the Tectonic Plate(s) of Eastern North America, an amateur’s collection of marine invertebrate fossils tells an intriguing natural history that we all pass every day on our way to work. Taking advantage of the well –eroded stream beds of northeastern DC area and the foresight of the National Area Park and Planning Commission to preserve them as they are, I have collected a sampling of corals spanning the late Pre-Cambrian to the late Cretaceous. Though the collection is spotty from the perspective of diversity, it tells an interesting story of what went on during that time.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group. Parking is available in the west side parking lot of the NMNH.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society.

Advertisements

October 18 meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, October 18

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

The Oldest Ceratopsians (and the Origin of Horned Dinosaurs) from a Fabulous Jurassic Fauna in Western China

Catherine Forster, Professor of Biology, George Washington University

Since 2001, The George Washington University and the Institute for Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology have collaborated in expeditions to the Late Jurassic Shishugou Formation in Xinjiang Province, China. Field research there in the western reaches of the Gobi Desert can be extremely difficult due to high heat, wind storms, and occasional deluges, but it has also always been extremely productive. Through the years the expeditions have collected numerous new animals including crocodilians, turtles, lizards, cynodonts, and theropod, sauropod, and ornithischian dinosaurs. Notably, we have discovered the two earliest members of the Ceratopsia (horned dinosaurs), Yinlong and Hualianceratops. These discoveries show that the origin of this group extends well into the Jurassic, and morphology unique to these taxa strengthen the sister-group relationship between ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society

October 2017 Flyer.docx

Paleontological Society of Washington sept. 2017 meeting

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, September 20

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

New frontiers in crinoid paleobiology: building and exploring the crinoid tree of life

Selina R. Cole

Springer Post-doctoral Fellow Department of Paleobiology
National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

Crinoids are a diverse group of marine invertebrates with a rich fossil record that spans nearly 500 million years and includes over 8,000 named species. Recently, significant efforts have been made to resolve evolutionary relationships among crinoids, resulting in major advances in understanding the crinoid tree of life. As a result, crinoids are rapidly becoming a model group for addressing paleontological questions within an evolutionary context. This has opened many new avenues for research in crinoid paleobiology, including studies of extinction, evolutionary radiation, paleoecology, and morphologic change.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society

GSW 1521: Rifts and the extrusive rocks within them

The Geological Society of Washington
founded 1893
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2017
MEETING 1521
MICHAEL RYAN, The Magma Physics Project
Columnar jointing mechanics in three dimensions
CHUCK BAILEY, The College of William & Mary
Normal faulting and graben development as catalysts for Late
Cenozoic landscape change, Fish Lake Plateau, Utah
BETH MCCLELLAN, Radford University
Evolution of a Neoproterozoic intracontinental rift: New insights
from provenance analysis of conglomerates in the Mount Rogers
Formation, SW Virginia
TALKS WILL BE 20 MINUTES w/ QUESTIONS TO FOLLOW
___________________________________
Refreshments at 7:30 p.m. Formal program at 8:00 p.m.
John Wesley Powell Auditorium
2170 Florida Avenue NW, Washington, DC
www.gswweb.org

Meeting flyer to post

May meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, May 17

Q?rius theatre, National Museum of Natural History, Constitutional Ave. entrance

Fossil Dinoflagellate Cysts – A Tour of Applications for the 21st Century

Lucy E. Edwards

U.S. Geological Survey Reston, VA

Dinoflagellates are a fascinating group to study as fossils. This presentation will highlight recent applications and current advances in the study of the organism and, more importantly to PSW fans, its preserved fossils. Topics covered will include new twists on the old standbys: biostratigraphy, paleoecology, and taphonomy, followed by things like microbial preferences in cyst degradation, and what the ontogeny of cyst formation can tell us about extreme environments. Dinocyst humor will also be included.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted to the Q?rius theatre at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitutional Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society

February 15 meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, February 15

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

The Natural History of Horses

Raymond L. Bernor

Professor, Department of Anatomy, Howard University College of Medicine

The Evolution of horses through the Cenozoic has drawn the attention of evolutionary biologists from the mid-19th century. A brief summary of this history is given as a background to the speakers own research on Old World Neogene equids through a number of field-based and museum based studies that span North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Systematics, biogeography, paleoecology, paleodiet and functional anatomy of 3-toed and 1-toed horses are all themes presented in the talk.

Hippotherium primigenium Bernor et al., 1997

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society

PSW seminar: Evolution of the butterflies

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, November 16

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

Evolution of moths and butterflies – the challenges of gathering reliable evidence from a poor fossil record

Maria Heikkila

Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellow at the NMNH, Department of Paleobiology and Department of Entomology

A full understanding of the evolution of moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera) requires a robust time frame for the diversification events of the major lineages and the behavioral and structural novelties they exhibit. Fossils are essential in divergence time estimates, but lepidopterans are poorly represented in the fossil record. The known fossils have been minimally studied, many remain undescribed, and nearly all lack convincing assignments of systematic position. The aim of my work is to critically review the identifications of the important known fossil Lepidoptera.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society