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NOVA Green Festival

NVCC Green Festival 2018

Towards Environmental Resiliency in a Changing World

Thursday, April 26, 2018 ● 9:15 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Annandale Campus

CE Building, Forum, Gym, and Theatre

Free and Open to the Public

Festival Highlights:

  •  Screening of the 2016 Film The Age of Consequences
  • Keynote Address by Michelle Wyman
  • Executive Director, National Council for Science and the Environment
  • Free Gifts
  • Lunch for first 200 Pre-Registered Attendees
  • Drawings for a Chance to Win a Kayak or a Bicycle
  • Information Booths for Environmental Organizations

 Information at http://www.nvcc.edu/green-festival/2018/index.html

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March 21 meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, March 21

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

The biology of Trichoplax adhaerens and how it relates to the evolution of Metazoa

Carolyn Smith

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke,

National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Trichoplax is a unique example of an animal that locomotes to find food despite lacking muscles or a nervous system. It is a small, ciliated marine animal that glides on surfaces feeding upon microalgae and cyanobacteria, which it digests externally. It has only six cell types, each with a phenotype and function variably homologous to a cell type present in complex animals. However, Trichoplax relies only on primitive modes of intercellular communication to coordinate the activity of its cells for directed movement and feeding. Similar cell types and simple modes of intercellular communication may have been employed by Proterozoic ancestors of the Metazoa.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Cooper Reading Room at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group. Parking is available in the west side parking lot of the NMNH. http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society.

February meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, February 21

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

Tracing Human Origins, Migration, and Settlement using Modern and Ancient DNA

Dr. Miguel G. Vilar

Senior Program Officer and Lead Scientist for National Geographic’s Genographic Project

The availability of DNA technology has given anthropologists a new way to test hypotheses and push the boundaries of our understanding of where we came from and how we populated the globe. Since 2005, National Geographic’s Genographic project has been in the forefront in the field of Archaeogenetics, bringing together anthropologists, archaeologists, DNA specialists, bioinformaticians, and citizens around the globe in a quest to erase boundaries, and better understand our shared common heritage. Come learn how DNA changed our understanding of human evolution, human diversity, and human history.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group. Parking is available in the west side parking lot of the NMNH.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society.

January 17, 2018 Paleontological Society of Washington meting announcement

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, January 17

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

Dawn and Early Morning of the Reptiles: New Discoveries, New Mysteries.

Adam Pritchard

Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellow, National Museum of Natural History

Smithsonian Institution

The three great lineages of reptiles appeared in the Permian and Triassic Periods, over 200 million years ago. The earliest stages of the evolution of archosaurs (dinosaurs, crocodylians), lepidosaurs (lizards, snakes), and turtles remain shrouded in mystery. New research, combining traditional paleontology and computer imaging, reveal an amazing diversity of small-bodied Triassic reptiles, including species with beaked, bird-like skulls; over-developed jaw muscles for powerful bites; and giant claws for digging. However, new studies of family relationships among the earliest reptiles suggest that long gaps remain in the fossil record and that much of reptilian history remains locked in the Earth.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group. Parking is available in the west side parking lot of the NMNH.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society.

Paleontological Society of Washington November seminar

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, November 15

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

An Amateur’s Collection of Corals from the North East DC Area

Christopher Hough

Member, Paleontological Society of Washington

From the Coastal Plain to the eastern edge of the Tectonic Plate(s) of Eastern North America, an amateur’s collection of marine invertebrate fossils tells an intriguing natural history that we all pass every day on our way to work. Taking advantage of the well –eroded stream beds of northeastern DC area and the foresight of the National Area Park and Planning Commission to preserve them as they are, I have collected a sampling of corals spanning the late Pre-Cambrian to the late Cretaceous. Though the collection is spotty from the perspective of diversity, it tells an interesting story of what went on during that time.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group. Parking is available in the west side parking lot of the NMNH.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society.

October 18 meeting of the Paleontological Society of Washington

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, October 18

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

The Oldest Ceratopsians (and the Origin of Horned Dinosaurs) from a Fabulous Jurassic Fauna in Western China

Catherine Forster, Professor of Biology, George Washington University

Since 2001, The George Washington University and the Institute for Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology have collaborated in expeditions to the Late Jurassic Shishugou Formation in Xinjiang Province, China. Field research there in the western reaches of the Gobi Desert can be extremely difficult due to high heat, wind storms, and occasional deluges, but it has also always been extremely productive. Through the years the expeditions have collected numerous new animals including crocodilians, turtles, lizards, cynodonts, and theropod, sauropod, and ornithischian dinosaurs. Notably, we have discovered the two earliest members of the Ceratopsia (horned dinosaurs), Yinlong and Hualianceratops. These discoveries show that the origin of this group extends well into the Jurassic, and morphology unique to these taxa strengthen the sister-group relationship between ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society

October 2017 Flyer.docx

Paleontological Society of Washington sept. 2017 meeting

The Paleontological Society of Washington

7:00 pm, Wednesday, September 20

National Museum of Natural History, Constitution Ave. entrance

New frontiers in crinoid paleobiology: building and exploring the crinoid tree of life

Selina R. Cole

Springer Post-doctoral Fellow Department of Paleobiology
National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

Crinoids are a diverse group of marine invertebrates with a rich fossil record that spans nearly 500 million years and includes over 8,000 named species. Recently, significant efforts have been made to resolve evolutionary relationships among crinoids, resulting in major advances in understanding the crinoid tree of life. As a result, crinoids are rapidly becoming a model group for addressing paleontological questions within an evolutionary context. This has opened many new avenues for research in crinoid paleobiology, including studies of extinction, evolutionary radiation, paleoecology, and morphologic change.

Non-Smithsonian visitors will be escorted from the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH to the Q?rius auditorium at 6:50 and 6:55 p.m. Society members will host the speaker for dinner at the Elephant & Castle (1201 Pennsylvania Ave.) prior to the meeting. Members may meet at the restaurant or inside the Constitution Ave. entrance of the NMNH at 5:00 and walk to the restaurant as a group.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/paleontological_society