Category Archives: USGS

USGS: Martinez on energy resource impacts

Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Seminar

Cericia Martinez, USGS – Denver, CO

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 – 12 Noon

Via WebEx and National Center, Room 3A409

Quantifying potential future impacts of energy resource development

Development of continuous energy resources (often referred to as “unconventional”) is anticipated to continue expanding in the future. In an effort to anticipate and inform natural resource management questions and conservation strategies in areas where oil and gas extraction may occur, a Powell Center Working Group proposed a modeling framework for assessing potential development impacts.  In this Mendenhall presentation, an implementation of the framework will be presented that seeks to quantify the potential impacts of developing continuous oil or gas resources based on information within the USGS petroleum assessments. An illustration of the modeling approach will be shown building from a recent assessment of oil and gas resources in the Mancos Shale in the Piceance Basin of Western Colorado. The illustration will include examples of modeling potential habitat conversion and soil loss.

WebEx Info

Topic: Mendenhall Seminar – Cericia Martinez
Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Time: 12:00 pm, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)
Meeting number: 714 237 248
Meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)

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Teleconference: National Center in Reston, VA Dial In: x4848
DOI Dial In Number: 703-648-4848
Non-DOI Toll Free Dial In Number: 1-855-547-8255*
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USGS Mendenhall seminar: sea-level rise threats to endangered species

Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Seminar

Sara Zeigler, USGS – Woods Hole, MA

When: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 – 12 Noon

Where: Via WebEx and National Center, Room 4C315

Details:

A multi-disciplinary approach for understanding sea-level rise threats to endangered species (or “Ecologists + Geologists = cool science”)

Managers within DOI and state agencies as well as private conservation organizations are tasked with protecting species reliant on highly dynamic coastal ecosystems – landforms effected by sea-level rise, changing storm regimes, and increasing infrastructure. A multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder data collection and analysis approach that can be used to inform conservation and management of species like piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) in these dynamic coastal environments will be described. This approach required collaboration across several DOI agencies and USGS science centers. The speaker will describe a smartphone application developed for data collection (‘iPlover’), Bayesian network models constructed for data analysis, and example applications of the approach for mapping piping plover habitat suitability at sites along the U.S. Atlantic coast. The applications of this approach are broad and will facilitate and increase cooperation among scientists and managers in the efficient conservation of endangered species.

WebEx Info

Topic: Mendenhall Presentation by Dr. Sara Zeigle
Date: Wednesday, September 14, 2016
Time: 11:30 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)
Meeting number: 710 957 575
Meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
Host Key: 385542

JOIN WEBEX MEETING https://usgs.webex.com/usgs/j.php?MTID=m8f42cf8b847d782645835945e519f342 Meeting number: 710 957 575 Host key: 385542 JOIN BY PHONE National Center in Reston, VA Dial In: x4848 DOI Dial In Number: 703-648-4848 Non-DOI Toll Free Dial In Number: 1-855-547-8255* Security Code: 91930 followed by the # sign

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USGS Mendenhall: tropical cyclone landfall records

Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Seminar

Terrence McCloskey, USGS – St. Petersburg, FL

When: Thursday, August 18, 2016 – 12 Noon

Where: Via WebEx and National Center, Room 3A409 (Chief Geologist’s Conference Room)

Details:

Paleotempestology: Using organic geochemical proxies to improve the resolution of tropical cyclone landfall records

Due to the brevity of the historical record, the long term activity pattern of tropical cyclones along the western margins of the North Atlantic is not well understood. Paleotempestology attempts to mitigate this lack by using geologic methods to extend landfall records thousands of years into the past. A primary objective is to identify climatic mechanisms driving the large, low-frequency changes in activity levels observed in nearly all millennial-scale landfall records. Increasing the spatial coverage of long-term records and the sensitivity of event detection are important challenges in improving our understanding of these activity regime changes. This project aims at using organic geochemical proxies capable of detecting smaller/more distant storms in order to improve the completeness of local records. Doing so requires several preliminary steps, including proxy development, the identification of event signatures, the assessment of event layer preservation/alteration over time, and deconvolving the environmental history of each study site. We address these issues based on work conducted in the Pearl River marsh, LA and Waccasassa Bay, FL.

Hawaiian erosion talk at USGS Reston

The Last Land: How humans changed erosion in Hawaii  

Jonathan Stock, Research Geologist and Director,

USGS Innovation Center

 

SPECIAL SEMINAR

Thursday – April 7, 2016

12 Noon

Room 3A-409

National Center, Reston

USGS Mendenhall seminar: Mariana Islands seismicity & infrasound

Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Seminar

John Lyons, USGS – Anchorage, AK

When: Monday, May 18, 2015 – 12 Noon

Where: Via WebEx and National Center, Room 3A409 (Chief Geologist’s Conference Room)

Details:

Long-period seismicity and infrasound driven by shallow magmatic degassing at Mount Pagan, Mariana Islands

Mount Pagan (570 m) is the currently active vent on the north end of Pagan Volcano, Mariana Islands.  Since the establishment of a monitoring network in 2013, a persistent degassing plume, long-period (LP) seismicity and infrasound, and infrequent small degassing explosions have dominated activity. The current low-level, open vent activity provides an ideal platform for studying the source processes of LP events, and how they relate to degassing. Many active volcanoes display LP (0.2-5 Hz) seismicity and because variations in LP activity often herald changes in eruption behavior, understanding the source mechanisms that generate LP events is a primary goal of volcano seismology. Expanding observations to include other data types greatly facilitates the interpretation of LP events. Studies correlating seismic and infrasound data have revealed important linkages between shallow LP seismicity and the generation of LP infrasound at other open vent, basaltic systems. Some form of degassing often accompanies LP activity, and integrating seismic and infrasound data with plume observations or gas chemistry allows further refinement of source models. In this study, we focus on characterizing the LP activity and interpreting the source processes generating the seismic and infrasonic signals through waveform modeling. The results are combined with gas emission and composition data and information about the shallow geologic structure to develop a model of shallow degassing for Mount Pagan.

WebEX Info

Topic: Mendenhall research Seminar
Date: Monday, May 18, 2015
Time: 11:00 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)
Meeting number: 714 351 061
Meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
Host Key: 237217

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connections, counting the presenter, for example:

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Teleconference: National Center in Reston, VA Dial In: x4848
DOI Dial In Number: 703-648-4848
Non-DOI Toll Free Dial In Number: 1-855-547-8255*
Security Code: 91930 followed by the # sign

Seth Burgess at USGS Reston: magmatism and mass extinctions

Special Seminar

Seth Burgess*, USGS – Menlo Park, CA

* Recipient of the 2014 Cozzarelli Prize (http://www.pnas.org/site/misc/cozzarelliprize.xhtml)

When: Monday, April 27, 2015 – 11 AM

Where: Via WebEx and National Center, Room 1C400 (Visitor Center)

Details:

Using high-precision geochronology to test the link between magmatism and mass extinction

Broad temporal coincidence between select Phanerozoic instances of mass extinction and large igneous province (LIP) magmatism has led many to hypothesize a causal link between the two. Testing the plausibility of this connection depends on the tempo of both and their relative timing. Thus, dating the records of mass extinction and magmatism with the maximum possible precision and accuracy is critical. This presentation will detail the application of U/Pb thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) geochronology to (1) volcanic ash beds intercalated with the fossil record of the end-Permian mass extinction, and (2) lava flows, sills, and pyroclastic rocks of the Siberian Traps LIP. New dates permit a revised calculation of the tempo of magmatism and mass extinction and allow resolution of their relative timing.

WebEX Info

Topic: Mendenhall Fellow Talk: Seth Burgess

Date: Monday, April 27, 2015
Time: 10:30 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)
Meeting number: 719 125 959
Meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
Host Key: 819447

Click the following link to view or edit your meeting information, or to start your meeting.

https://usgs.webex.com/usgs/j.php?MTID=m32cf97ac718381238449cfb2a6e6cd9f

Teleconference: National Center in Reston, VA Dial In: x4848
DOI Dial In Number: 703-648-4848
Non-DOI Toll Free Dial In Number: 1-855-547-8255*
Security Code: 91930 followed by the # sign

Mendenhall seminar @ USGS: Quakes on Wasatch Fault

Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Seminar

Scott Bennett, USGS – Golden, CO

When: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 – 12 Noon

Where: Via WebEx and National Center, Room 1C400 (Visitor Center)

Details:

How Big and How Frequent Are Earthquakes on the Wasatch Fault in Utah? Using Paleoseismology and Lidar to Evaluate Earthquake Rupture Patterns

The 350-km-long Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) consists of ten west-dipping normal fault segments at the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range Province, Utah. Fresh fault scarps at the foot of the Wasatch Mountains indicate that large earthquakes have recently occurred on the WFZ, as first documented by G.K. Gilbert in the 1880s. The most recent earthquake predates written records and European settlement in the 1840s, leaving paleoseismologists to the tasks of determining the size and frequency of past earthquakes and estimating the current seismic hazard. Over three decades of paleoseismic trench research having produced abundant earthquake timing data along the central WFZ. These data have been interpreted as evidence for ruptures during large (M≥7.0) Holocene (<11 ka) earthquakes that were restricted to a single fault segment. However, uncertainties in earthquake timing permit earthquake correlations that allow for longer ruptures that spanned segment boundaries. To improve rupture length estimates and evaluate the persistence of Holocene rupture termination at central WFZ segment boundaries, a collaborative team from the USGS and the Utah Geological Survey conducted four paleoseismic trench studies near these boundaries. Data from paleoseismic trenches constrain the timing and surface displacement of Holocene earthquakes and, when integrated with results from adjacent trenches, provide new constraints on surface rupture length and earthquake magnitude. We have also analyzed new high-resolution (8 pts/m2) airborne lidar data along the central WFZ, which provide unprecedented elevation information for lake shoreline features associated with late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville. These faulted shoreline features serve as strain markers across the WFZ, permitting precise fault offset estimates near WFZ segment boundaries for the past ~10­–20 kyr. I will summarize paleoseismic and geomorphic constraints on the extent of recent surface-rupturing earthquakes and evidence for non-persistent rupture terminations at segment boundaries along the central Wasatch fault zone. These findings will permit a more accurate characterization of the earthquake hazard in the Wasatch Front region.

WebEX Info

Topic: (20) Mendenhall Seminar: Scott Bennett
Date: Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Time: 12:00 pm, Eastern Standard Time (New York, GMT-05:00)
Meeting number: 711 911 008
Meeting password: (This meeting does not require a password.)
Host Key: 819057

Click the following link to view or edit your meeting information, or to start your meeting.

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Teleconference: National Center in Reston, VA Dial In: x4848
DOI Dial In Number: 703-648-4848
Non-DOI Toll Free Dial In Number: 1-855-547-8255*
Security Code: 91930 followed by the # sign